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Anatomy of an application for copyright registration

Posted by ipelton on: September 19th, 2011

I recently launched a totally redesigned website at www.erikpelton.com. The new site has lots of new content in all formats (audio, video, text, photo,…). Because this is new content, or old content presented in a new collection and design, I thought it was important to file to register the work as a copyright. And I like to practice what I preach — every business should ensure that its most important original materials are registered copyrights with the Library of Congress.

What does an application for copyright registration look like? Here is some basic copyright registration information followed by a copy of my application to register the content from erikpelton.com

  • Copyrights are registered with the Library of Congress. www.copyright.gov
  • A registration is not necessary for basic copyright protection but does provide benefits, particularly if litigation is required later to enforce the copyright rights.
  • For a website, you can submit representative pages or all of the files from the site. I used a software program to download the entire site.
  • Electronic filing of a copyright application is less money than a paper filing and is generally $35. If necessary when filing electronically, a deposit of the “work” can still be sent to the Library of Congress in the mail.
  • A “Copyright Basics” brochure (PDF) from the Library of congress is here.
  • Regardless of whether you file to register a copyright for a work of original content, you should always use a copyright notice
  • Paper applications for copyright registration can take more than 2 years to become registered.
  • Search Library of Congress copyright records here.

 

 

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One Response
  1. […] In September 2011, I posted about what an application for copyright registration with the Library of Congress looks like. See: Anatomy of an application for copyright registration. […]