I have finally recovered from all the activity from the INTA® conference at the end of May in Orlando, Florida.  Here are a few things I learned this year:

  • Intellectual property is an international affair. Many (most?) of the attendees are not from the US. And relationship around the world can be key in helping clients.
  • There is increasing divisions and distinctions between three types of trademark service providers: large law firms, smaller boutique law firms, and online providers that offer little or no legal advice.
  • Trademark lawyers can get caught up in trademarks and businesses, but in the end it is a people business — working with other trademark lawyers, and helping business people grow and strengthen their companies.
  • The next 12 months will be a busy year for developments in the (U.S,) world of trademarks: new TTAB rules, new USPTO fees, potential new USPTO procedures for challenging non-uses, possible Supreme Court cases regarding disparagement and Section 2(a) of the Lanham Act, and potential legislation regarding the USPTO’s expenses and costs on appeals of Ex Parte TTAB decisions to District Courts (costs currently borne by the Applicant).
  • Orlando without children is a much different place.
  • The INTA general education sessions have become too unwieldy. By appealing to a mass international audience, the majority of topics are not covered in an advanced fashion.
  • Speaking with IP law professors is quite interesting, as they see the world of IP through a different lens and it is helpful to compare with my client practice.
  • The Orlando convention center is too big. You can be next to the center, and still be 3/4 of a mile from where you need to be in the convention.
  • I am quite thankful for uberx! (see prior bullet point)
  • Orlando’s slogan – “You don’t know the half of it®” – is bizarre and not a good one.
  • Meet the Bloggers event is still fun to host! See pictures below.

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